Life is intense: Another medical post

Earlier today I was hit with a realization, a moment of clarity if you will. I realized how much I have gone through in — less than a month — and actually had to sit down under the weight of it all. And that was only in terms of the doctor appointments, procedures, and tests I’ve had to deal with. It didn’t include fun things like brunch with a bunch of good friends or the wonders of FaceTime.

All within the last few weeks I’ve gone through multiple GI tests including an endoscopy, a multiple day “study” to check my stomach pH and see if I really am having acid reflux, and a gastric emptying study. All of these provided useful but slightly conflicting information. I have collected yet another diagnosis. I don’t want more diagnoses but it seems, lately anyways, that answers bring diagnoses.

Because of my (new) gastroparesis (a word that my browser does not recognize), I have to adjust my diet again. I have to relearn how to eat. In some ways I started to feel better rather quickly once I started adjusting my diet. However, there’s a pretty steep learning curve to relearning how to eat at the age of 34. There are now more foods I am supposed to avoid. Before this I had a very restricted diet because of my allergies and intolerances. Now, I can’t think about the restrictions or I want to scream.

But that’s not all. I also went through an EMG “of my upper extremities” which just means my arms had electrodes attached to muscle groups and then needles poked in those muscle groups. Thankfully my doctor who performed this test is very gentle. Then yesterday I spent five hours with a psychologist going through neuropsychology testing. Five hours. You cannot even imagine the level of brain dead I was by the time I got home. The testing was mentally exhausting and also depressing when I stopped to think about all the times I struggled or ran into a (metaphorical) brick wall. Then there was also the back and forth to my GP doctor’s office for an infection. Because when you’re sick all the time, getting “normal sick” is even more difficult. And thankfully the allergic reaction to that antibiotic was not anaphylaxis that landed me in the ER. (Been there, done that, already have the tshirt.)

Yesterday, I decided any time I have to fill in the “occupation” blank on a doctor’s forms I’m going to say “professional patient.” It’s exhausting keeping up with all my doctors, appointments, and keeping my own medical records up to date. I need to find a way to make this a job where I can also provide doctors with feedback of their office and procedures.

I’m scared that I’m going to still load more diagnoses on top of everything else but I’m trying very hard to stop myself from falling into that deadly cycle of thinking. I cannot get stuck thinking like that. Still though, I wonder what a “normal healthy” person would do if suddenly faced with the amount of doctors and appointments that I’ve been dealing with. Every appointment meant sitting (or standing or pacing) in a waiting room and having little control over a number of events. You think it’s bad to sit waiting for a doctor for 15 minutes? Fifteen minutes is actually good! You think it’s annoying to have to go to the doctor? Try having two different five hour tests in a two week time period.

Sometimes I wonder how I deal with it all. I know my friends help so very much. My cats and my husband help more than I can really fathom…. but I also spend a great deal of time alone. Anxiety and depression continue to be very real and scary problems for me. I have no idea when “things” will “calm down” again. At this point in 2015 I’m happy I haven’t been to the ER (yet) this year. I really hope I can find some kind of normal in the next few months. Normal is having nothing out of the ordinary (health wise) happening in at least 2-3 months. That means nothing that I don’t already have a plan for coping with.

I’ve finally stopped asking “Why me?” but now I find myself asking “Don’t I have enough already?” It’s intense and overwhelming and the average person probably cannot even begin to imagine let alone actually understand what it’s like to live as someone with chronic disease and chronic pain.

Author: Histamine Queen

Nerd, wife, knitter, writer, cat mom, and comic book reader w/masters of science in Applied Sociology. I have histamine intolerance, lots of food allergies and sensitivities - including gluten. And I have multiple sclerosis fibromyalgia, asthma, drug allergies, and migraines. Basically, I have a collection of invisible chronic health problems. I don't just survive these things, but sometimes I do hate them because I see doctors so often that keeping healthy and staying full time employed is currently impossible.

2 thoughts on “Life is intense: Another medical post”

  1. I’m going through some hectic health times right now as well. Sometimes I wish I could just take a vacation from being sick- even if it were just for a day!

    1. YES! Even trying to take a day off doesn’t work because there’s still things that MUST be done. I actually marked a two and a half week period on my calendar so I can try to avoid appointments then and go more than a week without one.

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