Finding science on the internet about candida overgrowth is almost impossible

Part 1. (edited 8/12/2017 6:30pm CST)J

You could call this post my first attempt at finding information.  It was semi-successful. After finally convincing my immunologist there’s something there, despite no white patches in my mouth; he did a throat culture. Now that I’ve started antifungal infusions I’d love to find some useful* information about fungal overgrowth.

This is one of the better explanations about candida overgrowth that I found from a not academic journal site. And it still has problems. That led me to academic journal searches. What annoys me the most is the utter lack of sources. So there’s no way to know if anything about the food recommendations is accurate. In general, it’s interesting. I didn’t try the ‘spit test’ but I do know my spit is often thick like even when I’m not dehydrated. So, hmmmm. But anyways.

….. I realized after I hit publish I need to point out that I use interesting and possibly credible and definitely questionable sources or sites as ways to get ideas for more research. I’ve been researching for my own benefit for over a decade and only recently decided I’d start sharing some of the things I find since there’s so much out there on the Internet. For example, because of that source I knew to look out for (credible and proven) essential oil usages. …. And now we continue.

I also found an interesting article discussing that dysmotility and PPI use are independent risk factors for bacterial and/or fungal overgrowth. Causes are interesting and helpful to understand – to a point. You reach a point where you want help, not explanations for why.

The other potential I found is a literature review from 2014, and as a general rule, literature reviews are always at least a tiny bit helpful.** That article is behind a pay wall but all the references are available and it’s almost always better to go to the original source. A lot of the references are behind paywalls as well, or very highly specific studies. How about, The epidemiology of hematogenous candidiasis caused by difference Candida species. And then there’s this one, Candida albicans: a review of its history, taxonomy, epidemiology, virulence attributes, and methods of strain differentiation.

The abstract of this article,

“Candidiasis: predisposing factors, prevention, diagnosis and alternative treatment,” mentions: “In the past two decades, it has been observed an abnormal overgrowth in the gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory tracts, not only in immunocompromised patients, but also related to nosocomial infections and even in healthy individuals. There is a widely variety of causal factors that contribute to yeast infection which means that candidiasis is a good example of a multifactorial syndrome.” I point that out since it mentions gastrointestinal, urinary, and respiratory. Interesting. Wish I could read that one, but again, f’ing paywall. Side note: Need to check the references from it. See? The references are like a reading list.

This article clears up that candida infections can ‘blow up’ into blood stream infections. I know ‘blow up’ is a horrible choice of words. It also uses the words “in certain groups of vulnerable patients…” so this blood stream infection must be super super rare. Here’s another that mentions bloodstream infections. Candida albicans versus non-albicans bloodstream infections: the comparison of risk factors and outcome. (lots of math in that one)

This one has pictures and focuses on specific regions of the body that are infected. (when you hit that link you won’t see pictures, you actually have to keep reading)

And I didn’t know that treatment options for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis were so controversial. (Or was in 2011.)

This next one I was super excited to find because it’s available! Effects of plant oils on Candida albicans. It’s super short but it’s easy to read and has results. PDF direct link here.

If you understand, or know someone who understands, bacteria biofilms, then this article might be interesting for you. Again, paywall. I got my hopes up since it talked how Candida is affected by salvia and dietary sugars. I’d really like an answer on the sugar thing. A clear, backed by science answer, with details. DETAILS!

I’ve also found information that says I’m at risk for candida infections just because I have MS. Other risk factors include oral birth control and corticosteroids. My thrush got worse after I was on prednisone a few times this year too.

I’m going to try rinsing*** with a few drops of peppermint oil in water before bed, and when my mouth tastes extra foul. Before this I only knew about tea tree oil. Tea tree oil is also foul, but not as horrible as the flavor of candida.

So far the search has been frustrating. It might be helpful to just look for information on fungal overgrowth but then that’s going to run into all the not science information out there about mold exposure.

*useful. Like based in science and cited

**I have a Master of Science in Applied Sociology. I can write an excellent literature review so I know when I spot a bad one. I also learned, in undergrad, how to identify a source as credible. Not everything on the Internet is true, neither is Santa. If I couldn’t successfully judge a source, I would not have graduated with two degrees.

***Don’t swallow. *snicker*

Author: Histamine Queen

Nerd, wife, knitter, writer, cat mom, and comic book reader w/masters of science in Applied Sociology. I have histamine intolerance, lots of food allergies and sensitivities - including gluten. And I have multiple sclerosis fibromyalgia, asthma, drug allergies, and migraines. Basically, I have a collection of invisible chronic health problems. I don't just survive these things, but sometimes I do hate them because I see doctors so often that keeping healthy and staying full time employed is currently impossible.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *