Beginner’s Guide to Histamine Intolerance

Starting with a crash course on how to research on the Internet.

Important background information: I have an MS in Applied Sociology. I spent years in college learning how to identify objective sources for information. Clearly, you don’t know for sure that I’m lying, but who would lie about one sociology degree, let alone two? Sociology degrees aren’t sexy. Basically, a good rule of thumb is to judge every nonfiction book (and personal website) by its author. A doctor writing about histamine intolerance is going to do a better job than I will. Also, if someone is trying to sell you something in every single article they write, maybe they aren’t the best source. Or at least not your first and only source. I recommend looking for information that’s the same across multiple sources. A journalist trying to educate you about something is someone who’s good at telling people about stuff and things, not automatically good at researching stuff and things.

Update Jan. 7, 2018 – I saw this on Twitter. A guide to read and understand scientific papers for a non-scientist. (There’s a PDF link included in the page linked.)

Now that’s over and we can start. First and foremost, histamine is important and your body needs it. It’s necessary for healing. However, your body doesn’t need buckets and buckets of it.

I’ll start with some online sources and then a couple of books. When I started researching histamine intolerance there was very few things on the internet when you searched simply “histamine intolerance” and now such a search brings up clear easy to read sources as well as confusing sources that want you to buy recipe books or expensive supplements, or both. I think I started in 2008 and in the last 3 years the information seems to be growing exponentially. The first source Google provides is actually written by a doctor. Supposedly. I hope. She could be lying. but –  She also refers to one often cited academic journal article about histamine and histamine intolerance.

Side note, don’t be afraid of academic journal articles. I would suggest reading them slower – without skimming – if you’re unfamiliar. Also if you can, print it out and underline or highlight the parts that interest you. You’ll find that histamine intolerance is a little easier to handle if you understand some of the science behind histamine and what it does to your body. It’s completely understandable if you don’t want to start there though and so I’m only including one journal article here.

This article titled, Histamine and histamine intolerance, was published in The American Journal for Clinical Nutrition. I especially like this article because of a table that summarizes, or breaks down, symptoms mediated by histamine. Basically histamine is involved in the process of feeling that symptom. Again, it’s important to remember that your body does need histamine to function.

There are lots and lots of other online sources and remember they aren’t all equal. I recommend looking for different sources that agree. (Yes, I’m repeating some of the important things on purpose.) Also consider the type of information you’re looking for. For example, there are a ton of lists of high histamine foods out there and very few are exactly the same. You will probably find you can eat small amounts of some high histamine foods and that other high histamine foods are very bad things. With histamine intolerance, all food lists should be treated as guidelines. You know your body, you have to test on your own. However, some other information like food storage and preparation is fairly standard and doesn’t take a college degree to understand. Let’s continue with sources.

If you only want one link about histamine intolerance for now then go here.

1. This one mentions handling and storing of foods. Old food is higher in histamine and so this is an important factor of histamine intolerance diets. This is probably the biggest and most important thing you can do that I guarantee will make you feel better.

2. Food lists: by degree of tolerance, a more general explanation, and a list meant to help control chronic hives. (But at the time this was posted the 3rd link didn’t work. It’s worked in the past so I hope it’s temporary.) I recommend using a book for a food list and not getting bogged down in the details. I recommend using a food list to help you out in the beginning and help determine the real big trigger foods you need to avoid. Like for me, the last time I ate fresh grapes it was as if I was allergic to the grapes. It was horrible. There are high histamine foods you should (eventually) be able to eat small amounts of. Especially if the food in question is fresh.

3. A detailed site, which includes more than just food intolerances, by a board certified practitioner (That’ll make more sense when you see her bio) from Australia. She’s not a doctor, but she clearly has done something to educate herself. She’s also not pushing books at your all the time. I wouldn’t use this as a primary site, but it’s useful to see what information is the same across different sites.

4. This is a good general website about food intolerances and also includes a lot of information on histamine intolerance. The majority of the histamine intolerance information comes from research completed by Doctor Janice Joneja. She’s been doing this for decades. Note the histamine intolerance page has a lot of links and tons of information. It’ll be overwhelming if this is new for you, but it’s a great link because it’s updated!

5. Chris Kresser also has a site with regular blog posts and a ton of information about more than just histamine intolerance. You’ll note he has been studying and teaching for awhile.

6. How about my favorite book ever for food intolerances and food allergies? This was my first source for histamine intolerance information as well as other food sensitivities. It helped me figure out my sulfite sensitivity too. I discovered histamine intolerance by accident because I already owned this book due to being diagnosed with food allergies and I was paging through it… I stumbled on the histamine intolerance diet and discovered I’d already eliminated most of the problem foods on my own. There were just two more foods, vinegar and tomatoes, and I was effectively following the diet. (Dude tomatoes are in so many places!) There was a few other things too, like hydrolyzed oils and preservatives that I didn’t know about. At the time, removing vinegar and tomatoes helped a ton. It’s probably worth it even if it sounds painful. Literally, this book saved me.

7. If you can find it used, this is best described (?) as an updated version of that book in #6. I say used because I think it’s sold as a textbook and so automatically more expensive.

8. I recommend anything by Janice Vickerstaff Joneja.

9. The concept of a histamine or inflammation bucket might be a good place to start in understanding the effects on your body. This site has a decent explanation for the inflammation bucket and I also find the site to be an example of something that is not a good first source. I am cautious about any site that says they research their posts but do not provide the sources with enough information to be able to find them and read on your own. I’m also uncomfortable with sites where every post or article also includes a sales pitch. Use caution with this website. Also, use caution with her Facebook group, when I tried to be a contributing member I found it full of people who didn’t want to learn and didn’t recognize that every body is individual and different.

It’s taken me forever to build this post because I wanted a collection of information without getting too in depth and detailed. There’s so much more you could add to this, like detailed information about how histamine works in the body. But I feel most people aren’t going to care about that immediately, they want to feel better sooner, then learn about the other stuff. This is probably verging on too long as it is. Regardless of the sources I’ve listed here, I think the most important things for searching the internet for information on histamine intolerance is to judge the quality of the source you’re using. Anyone can call themselves an expert on the Internet. I’m not an expert but I’m happy to share information so that other people can maybe learn things a little faster, and with less pain and frustration.

If you’re actually reading this and think I missed a large hole somewhere, leave a comment. Thanks.

Author: Histamine Queen

Nerd, wife, knitter, writer, cat mom, and comic book reader w/masters of science in Applied Sociology. I have histamine intolerance, lots of food allergies and sensitivities - including gluten. And I have multiple sclerosis fibromyalgia, asthma, drug allergies, and migraines. Basically, I have a collection of invisible chronic health problems. I don't just survive these things, but sometimes I do hate them because I see doctors so often that keeping healthy and staying full time employed is currently impossible.