My advice for dealing with chronic thrush

This excludes medicinal intervention. This is not medical advice; I assume you’re an adult and you accept the consequences of your actions.

Peppermint has documented anti-fungal properties. I have tested and discovered that peppermint tea daily will help keep the thrush down. I’ve also started drinking some mint or peppermint tea after drinking milk or eating sweets like ice cream. If I don’t drink peppermint or mint tea for a few days, the thrush can start to make a comeback.

Probiotics. Prescript-assist probiotics suggest you empty a capsule into your mouth to help combat the thrush. I suggest doing this at bedtime. It helps. Also, taking a probiotic normally of course helps.

Sinus washing. If you get congested when you have thrush, it could be traveling up into your sinuses. Sinus wash can help remove the thrush, slow it down. I prefer the bottle style and recommend this brand. Make sure you use distilled water. Please, use distilled water.

Depending on your situation, you might also find a tongue scraper to  be useful. You have to be careful because a tongue irritated by thrush is more likely to bleed. You can use a tongue scraper too much.

If you get really desperate, you can mix hydrogen peroxide and water together and gargle. It helps to tilt your head back and let the mixture sit for 5-10 seconds. You need a quarter of the amount of peroxide compared to the amount of water. Put some water in a cup, and just a tiny bit of peroxide. Do not swallow. Do not do this very often because it could also effect the positive bacteria in your mouth.


Writing exercise: Habitual ritual

I completed the first 4 NaNoWriMo themed Coursera classes from Wesleyan earlier this year. They were super beneficial for me. This is one exercise from the course on setting and description. The instructions were to write about a ritual or routine in specific and significant detail in 500 to 750 words. I wrote mine about a specific type of doctor office visit appointment… getting my Xolair shots.


You went around twice before you find an empty space. You park your car, turn it off, take a breath and gather yourself, and leave and lock your car. You walk in the vague direction of the door, there’s no clear path between the cars – both parked and moving. It’s bright and a little too hot.

You pull up and park at the curb. Your travel time was less than 40 minutes; you skipped the construction on the highway. Before you leave the car, you take a breathe and gather yourself. From the curb the door to the office is less than a dozen steps. Immediately inside there is the window with sliding glass with a low counter. You nod in greeting, the woman behind the window slides open the small glass door, greets you, and passes you the clip board. You write your name and today’s date on the appropriate spaces and hand the clipboard back. The woman nods at you and you head on back through the door to the right. There’s a decoration of a smiling yellow face on the door which reminds you of decorations in elementary school.

Walking to the back, you pass a medical assistant and he says hi but nothing more, he’s busy. In the infusion center, not all the chairs are full. You never know if your appointment will be in a crowded room or if it’ll be you and the staff.

The head infusion nurse, Lynn, greets you with a smile, like always. She’s busy starting an IV for the young woman in the first chair. You smile, stopping at hi, while she’s with another patient. There are 8 chairs lined up on the right side, spaced enough for room for nurses to administer to their patients. You pick the third from the front. It’s one of the more comfortable dark red chairs. You place your bottle of water and phone on the table, your bag on the floor at your feet, and dig out your novel. You sit down, trying to get comfortable, for now the book is in your lap. The other older nurse, Kate, comes out from the back room where the wide variety of medicines and supplies are stored. The vials, bags, and syringes. This nurse is somewhat reserved but still friendly.

She greets you, “Good morning! Your Xolair is mixing.”

“Hi! Thanks.”

This means your shots are ready in 10 to 15 minutes. The medicine is thick and they don’t mix it until you arrive. In the meantime she brings you a blood pressure cuff, the small battery powered type that goes on your wrist. You attach the cuff around your left wrist and position your arm. The nurse stands ready to write down your vitals.

“124/76. Pulse 89.” She records the numbers as an alarm starts. The IV medicine for the second patient needs attention and the nurse heads to turn off the alarm. The alarms no longer startle you. Lynn is still busy with the same patient.

You sit quietly. The woman in the first chair is young and on oxygen. A thick book sits in her lap. The second patient is older than you, with her chair reclined. Sleeping perhaps? She’s curled up under a brightly colored fleece blanket. The fourth chair – to your right – makes the small child curled between the chairs even smaller. You don’t know how old he is but he doesn’t talk. He appears engrossed in his game on the tablet. It’s one of those educational games meant for kids to practice identifying words or colors and such. His watchful mother is nearby, periodically scrutinizing her phone.

Lynn is walking toward you with 2 syringes. How did you miss her leaving the room? She pulls up the short stool identical to every other doctor’s office and sits down near you. You sit forward in the chair and turn, offering your right arm first, as she pops the cap off syringe number one. The medicine goes into the back of your upper arm. That soft fleshy bit. Even knowing what to expect, the burning pinch is still a surprise. Now the first syringe is empty and she retrieves the second. This one goes in your left arm. You suck air through your teeth and it makes a hissing noise as she slowly pushes the syringe empty. One arm always seems to hurt more than the other.

“Does it hurt?”

“Just a little. Like usual.”

She nods as she finishes. You look at the clock high on the wall. 11:35. You can leave at 12:05. You must wait, in case this time your body decides the good medicine is bad. There’s almost zero risk though. You sit back, the pain in your arms a vague shadow. You open your book.


Immunologist visit – case study part 1

Last week I went to a follow up appointment with my immunologist. An immunologist is a bit like an allergy/asthma doctor except they know more about the immune system. My immune system is a special snowflake. This was my first follow up since my doctor said he would do a case study on me – as compared to throwing his hands up in the air and running in fear. I showed him information on histamine intolerance and the low histamine diet.

I waited 30 minutes and the visit with the doctor himself was about an hour and a half long. He took notes on his laptop through most of it. (MacBook Air) We went over a lot of things, including my migraines, asthma, allergies, food sensitivities and how easy (not) it is to be on the low histamine diet.

My biggest complaint for him was probably that I have to adapt the diet to me, there is conflicting sources of information about the diet, and despite my best efforts I can still have pretty bad breakthrough symptoms. Ok, those might happen on days I have chocolate – but there are other days I have chocolate where there are no breakthrough symptoms!

I also seem to be having problems with environmental triggers being worse. I explained some fun that took two days to recover from after sitting for about 20 minutes on my SIL’s couch. Shortness of breath, thrashed sinuses, foggy brain, the works! I’ve also been having problems waking up coughing in the middle of the night, like clockwork. I’ve since figured out that was a combination of two things, which I also told my doctor about. First one: environmental. Because of the fibromyalgia and increased commute times – we’ve gotten lax with vacuuming. You cannot get lax with vacuuming when you have four cats. I vacuumed the bedroom the afternoon of the doctor appointment and no coughing that night. Second thing: likely culprit was PABA in the vitamin b complex I was taking. It’s possible to be allergic to PABA and my breathing difficulties and gastrointestinal issues (I’ll spare the Internet those.) were likely caused by PABA. Especially since the issues got better over the course of 1-5 days after I stopped the supplement.

After discussing with my doctor, I’m going to research which b vitamins are useful for fibromyalgia and just take those specific vitamins instead of taking the lazy complex approach. (I’m already on just riboflavin for my migraines.) My doctor also didn’t have recommendations for me – he suggested I go with what I know my body will accept. Research required.

I kind of wanted steroids to help me get over the (likely) PABA reaction but I also didn’t necessarily want to deal with the side effects. My doctor told me to call if my asthma problems continue – even after I’ve recovered from the PABA reaction. My breathing issues have gotten better since vacuuming the bedroom and just with more time passing but I’m still having weird issues! I’m giving it a little more time and probably still calling the doctor so we can look at my asthma medicine.

Thankfully my allergy medicine seems to be keeping up. My hives seem to be better. It’s been months (?) since I’ve had a breakout. I still need benadryl but it’s as needed – not regularly. Now I need to figure out the eye allergy problems I’ve been having – but I know know if that’s a question for the immunologist or the ophthalmologist.

Doctor told me to come back in six months because I have a lot going on with my migraines. (New patient neurologist visit isn’t for over two months.) I can still call with an update if necessary and I figure I’ll go back sooner if it seems necessary. I did also find out something important – asthma and fibromyalgia should not really effect each other. (Note to self: remember to ask rheumatologist too.)

We’re definitely now going down the path where I have a ton of food allergies/intolerances caused by, at least in part (?) the histamine intolerance. I have no idea if the gluten (and now corn) intolerances are related to the histamine intolerance. My immune system is a special snowflake who is also paranoid. It seems like most of the food allergies I showed positive before are probably false positives. Problem is I might have some false negatives too. I’m still avoiding a lot of foods and paying special attention to the ones that give me acute reactions where I cannot breathe.

I’m just glad I’ve had less problems with face flushing and hives. The face flushing makes me look and feel badly sunburned.

Next steps:

1. Get migraines under control.

2. Clean problem areas of the house more often.

3. Exercise more for the fibromyalgia / asthma.