Observations on my eating and diet

All related to health and stuff.

Noticed recently that I eat more when I’m in enough pain that I need to take additional pain meds. (Wouldn’t it be nice to see the numbers on calories burned for people who aren’t always in pain? Seems like being in pain must burn more calories!) On top of that, I realized just this morning, that if I don’t feel well at all – no mental focus, all the fatigue, enough pain that standing more than a few minutes might be an issue – I could add more – then I don’t want to actually make myself meals. In fact, I don’t even want to use the brain power to even think about what kind of meal to prepare. Perhaps I’ve forgotten that your diet is part of your self care? If I don’t assemble a meal then I snack. I’ll snack all afternoon instead. When I do that it’s difficult to keep track of what I’ve eaten. Anything that resembles a meal is way easier to keep track of – even just mentally through the day. This seems like the better option compared to just grabbing a snack instead.

My diet is already difficult because I have to balance limitations placed on me because of food allergies, food intolerances/sensitivities that can be damn near deadly, gastroparesis, migraine triggers, trying to lose or at least maintain my weight, and now PCOS. MS has its own set of dietary recommendations and only some of those are similar to the recommendations for fibromyalgia. Avoid these foods, eat some of those foods, etc. etc. One health problem says eat low fiber, another health problem says eat high fiber. Low fiber wins. For example, I can’t not eat rice or potatoes. It’s just not happening. If I followed all of these diets I’d eat nothing but baked chicken and uh? Well I don’t even know. I’d hate my life. Anyways.

I will be making myself consider whether I want to develop a list of meals – right down to how many chicken nuggets I would need – for when I don’t feel well and can’t summon the mental focus to figure out what to eat. Do I want to spend the time and energy on this or do I just want to try a little harder when I’m making food for myself? I also need to think out and actually make decisions more often. That makes no sense but here’s what I mean. I cannot eat dinner (The dinner that my awesome husband makes that will be way more tasty than chicken nuggets or fish and chips from the freezer that might be an easy alternative.) late if the dinner is higher in fat because then my stomach spends most of the night digesting it. This is especially important if any of my health problems are (currently) aggravated or flaring. Maybe, when I can stop and make these choices the flares of pain/fatigue/bloating/nausea or any of the other things that might happen to make me feel crappier than usual, won’t last as long? Not sure if I want to actually hope this to be true. I imagine it’ll help only some of the time.

Also, I had an epiphany related to my muscular problems and my stomach. Had this epiphany at 4 am after I woke up from coughing and started refluxing food so I crawled out of bed for a bit. All of your muscles are part of you, and everything really is connected. I have a great deal of trouble with my muscles not wanting to work at their full range of motion. My eyes won’t focus out after I’ve spent a few hours knitting. Muscles that aren’t regularly stretched do actually seem to get shorter (and tighter). I wouldn’t be surprised if my muscle problems are what’s causing the gastroparesis to flare up.

tl;dr: I bet stretching helps my digestion more than I can even imagine. I will try harder when planning food choices when I’m alone and eating for one because maintaining your own personal diet – with variety – is also part of good self care. And I’m not going to stop eating ice cream or chocolate, but I do want to try drinking more low fat goat milk.

Gastroparesis: Sometimes you know more than your doctor

(American) society still seems to have this thing where doctors are revered and assumed to know this amazing amount of knowledge about things no one else understands (except on tv). It started hundreds of years ago with licensing and membership requirements to be able to restrict people who wanted to be doctors and it still hangs on… even though medical care in this country isn’t as good as other similar countries. Obviously the licensing is important and needs to be required. It offers protection. Not many people understand they must be honest and open with their doctors. Not many people understand that doctors should be willing to respect their patients. Doctors are not omnipotent gods.

All that said, people with chronic illnesses can end up knowing more than their doctors… or anyone they interact with who is a “medical professional”. Yesterday I explained gastroparesis to two different people in a medical field. The first was a dentist… I can completely understand a dentist not knowing about a GI disease but it’s still weird to have to explain. (See above.)

The second person was a dietician. I explained what my GI tests had found and in front of me she turned around to her computer and googled Gastroparesis. She printed out information from one site and then went over it with me. She kept on even after I realized it was a print out I had at home that I’d read through. She ignored the things I said like:

Information on gastroparesis varies between sources.
There’s only so much my doctor can help with because some things I just have to figure out on my own.
I needed lifestyle changes, not just diet changes.
Gastroparesis makes exercises difficult and problems with pain and fatigue make exercise harder.

Mostly she was happy about my weight loss. The weight loss I’d achieved because the gastroparesis limits how many calories I can consume at one sitting/in a day. One she was so happy was because she has to follow FDA guidelines. Guidelines that are for healthy people people not like me… people without chronic diseases that have no cure and aren’t caused by obesity. The only thing the dietician really helped me with yesterday was a little bit more understanding on how to approach monitoring my calorie intake – and how much fat, protein and carbs I need. Now that I think about it the only reason why I want to see her again is to see her response based on my additional weight loss…. I still can’t eat as much as my recommended calorie count for a day, so my weight loss will continue. (Hopefully I won’t add it back on later.)

The medical field in this country needs to change, but because our government’s views on medical care access are based on how much people deserve instead of recognizing that medical care access is a human right, we still have very far to go. This should also include changing the relationship between doctor and patient. People need to learn to advocate for themselves, which isn’t the same as arguing with their doctor that WebMD knows more. We need to learn to value our health and know that sometimes lifestyle changes are necessary.