Lego is doing this neat thing with historical location statues

The salon we go to for haircuts moved out of a dying consumerism center (a mall) to a shiny newer bright and busy consumerism center which also has a Lego store. This is important cause it’s the only reason we were in the mall. They have posted at least a dozen Lego statues about the mall along with information on the site, the time it took to build the statue and the size ratio. Like the Liberty Bell was a 1:1 ratio. Apparently I forgot to get pictures of most of the explanations of the statues and I’m sharing pictures of just a few. Side note: each model was built by a team of at least 3. Some people were “master builders.” What are the qualifications needed and the typical salary of a Master Builder working at Lego? Anyways, random blog post about Legos now continues with pictures. 

And the Washington Monument. 


Few more. Here’s the Jefferson Memorial. 

And the Lincoln Memorial. 

Then models of the Capital building, the White House and the Supreme Court building were by far the most awesome and impressive. The detail was great. Seeing the kids Ooo and wow and woah at the different models was really nice too. Cute. 

Here’s the one close up I grabbed of the White House. 

I could have sworn I took a picture of the Statue of Liberty model but it’s not on my phone so I guess I didn’t. A few pictures for the Supreme Court are next. 

And the last set of pictures is the Capital building. It’s sad I’m not as familiar with these monuments and important government buildings as I thought. I hope the children – and some of the adults – learned something from these statues. Can’t decide I prefer to call these statues or models. The picture I took of the Capital building model from above 

Happy Fourth of July

I was wondering as OP and I watched the fireworks last night what the origination of doing that was… Well, I found my answer.

From here originally:

On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks.

The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.

On June 24, 1826, Thomas Jefferson sent a letter to Roger C. Weightman, declining an invitation to come to Washington, D.C., to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It was the last letter that Jefferson, who was gravely ill, ever wrote. In it, Jefferson says of the document:

“May it be to the world, what I believe it will be … the signal of arousing men to burst the chains … and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form, which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. … For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.”

Congress established Independence Day as a holiday in 1870, and in 1938 Congress reaffirmed it as a holiday, but with full pay for federal employees. Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, fireworks, picnics and the playing of the “Star Spangled Banner” and marches by John Philip Sousa.