Preptober!

I’m doing it a little different this year. I’ve been working on my idea for NaNoWriMo in November since … April? Developing and prepping and redeveloping and restarting and procrastinating and, well, you get the idea. Actually maybe it’s been a year, it’s improved since the original idea though. Woah it’s improved. Anyways.

I learned about preptober from here first. I think. I also knew about prepping for nanowrimo from nanowrimo but never dug into it. I’m also sorta doing this. Uncertain how to share any of the content from the prompts though. Maybe here?

I’m still working through Planning Your Novel by Janice Hardy but I’m up to workshop 10 now. It’s been a slow process with all my doctor appointments and quite a few health problems over the year – like having shingles twice and then medicine making me feel worse on top of everything. Now I’m doing EMDR therapy which is sapping some of my creative mental energy but I’m still moving forward. Dammit I am!

I finished my 900 minutes (15 hours) goal in September despite having 14 doctor appointments. I’m going to make my goal 16 hours (or 960 minutes) for October which should be doable since I have less doctor appointments in the month of October. My goal for October is also to finish the working synopsis as much as I can – which is being held up by figuring out my antagonist.

And so far I’ve also updated social media icons with these and created my project.

July Camp NaNoWriMo Goal Achieved – and future plans

I was going to summarize each week of July Camp NaNo but I guess I got too busy writing to write blog posts! I did finish my goal of 1080 minutes or 18 hours for July 2019 Camp NaNo. I actually went a little over with 1155 minutes total.

I will definitely continue to summarize what I worked on and what I think I should work on next every day that I write. I’ll continue to keep the summary in my notebook for my current project. That way it’s really easy to look back at what I’ve done when I’m stuck on what to work on next… at least before I get to writing an outline.

Unfortunately, this project notebook has absolutely no organization at this point. In my experience, if you want to create a project bullet journal like for writing but don’t know how you want to arrange or organize, just dive in. You’ll need to use it and figure out your workflow to know how to organize the journal.

Most of the month was spent on developing some world building and the plot embryo concept I mentioned in my last blog post. I find the plot embryo concept extremely useful because once you have some of the slices of the pie, other slices start to fall in line. I had good luck with these world building exercises . I’m still using Planning Your Novel by Janice Hardy too.

My goal for August is 30-60 minutes of writing a day. I’m aiming for 1320 minutes which is an hour a day Monday through Friday only. I have a few more doctor appointments this month but hopefully they won’t interfere.

Past that, my goal is to be able to start outlining come October 1st for writing in November for NaNoWriMo. I have no idea if I can meet that goal since I’ve never developed a novel in this way before. I’ve been more of a “pantser” in the past because of an utter lack of understanding of story format and structure.

In hindsight I know I’ve never made it this far before because of my mental illnesses interfering — no severely interfering — with my fatigue, focus, and, well, general outlook on lie. It’s amazing how much my mental illnesses and how much I didn’t realize until the wall started to come down.

I’m going to keep pushing forward. I still have a lot of questions to answer before I can start outlining my story.

NaNoWriMo 2018 Prep

I remembered NaNoWriMo Prep in the beginning of October! I’ve done more prep this time too. Still no outline (yet).

I’ve joined the followers of Rachael Stephen. I like her and her videos. I love she’s a research nerd. I learned her approach to the embryo plot device, I recommend trying it out. At least try it out.

I’ve been a fan of Chuck Wendig for a while and his blog is fantastic for so many reasons. He’s talked lots and lots on NaNoWriMo and I’m sure he’ll talk more about it still. His post collecting the ways you can outline for NaNoWriMo is damned extensive. (I also like how he says National Plot Your Novel Month too.)

I’ve also done some bullet journal stuff for NaNoWriMo too. Not a lot, but I’ve decided to start a project journal/bullet journal for general writing stuff just for me. Like things to help get me writing and tips for outlining.

This time around, I might use these from Better Novel Project dot com too.

Day-by-Day NaNoWriMo Outline: Your 30-Day Cheatsheet

Day-by-Day NaNoWriMo Outline: Characters & Themes Cheatsheet | Better Novel Project

Master Outline | Better Novel Project

There’s also a lot of information at Fiction University by Janice Harding. I have her book. It’s useful. Here’s a guest post from her blog I really liked. The Alchemy of Inspiration.  I started a “pet peeves” list after reading that and it’s also very useful.

 

NaNoPrep 2016

Or a place to put more #nanoprep resources so they’ll be all in one spot. I’ve found some more resources this year. Less inspiration, more application perhaps?

Here’s my nanoprep list from last year.

Nanoprep official on nanowrimo official site. Here let me say official one more time.

I read somewhere about different types Nanowrimo writers and that post made me really curious about “worksheets.” oh hey, I found it. 5 types of NaNoWrimo Participants and your tools.

I found this writing site via searching for some Nano prep worksheets.  Here’s a specific nanoprep post I found useful. And a NaNoWrimo 2016 calendar! It’s in color but it seems ok when I printed it in black and white.

I love Janice Hardy’s approach to preparation and developing your idea into a novel. I have her book and she does some Nanoprep stuff on her blog too.

Free resources for writers from Word Hunter

Plot development worksheets! from/collected by Iconoclastic Writer

This site called “Geeks and Geeklets” seems great, for more than just NaNoWriMo too. I just discovered it. I don’t understand the rules for being in good standing to access some of their info though, just so you know that’s a thing.

Another Iconoclastic Writer post that might be useful

NaNoWriMo Prep: Planning your Novel’s beginning by Janice Hardy: I think I’ll actually use something like to keep me focused on the first section of the story and then when I have my word count for this I know how to pace the rest of the story. I wonder how likely I’ll be to actually stick with this!

I think this post is finished?

 

Too Many Hobbies October 2016 edition

Or, unofficial nanoprep to do list.

Mostly this is to order things in my head and if I put it here maybe it’s easier to find later!

  1. Finish the surge shawl WIP. It’s close.
  2. Actually finish that one baby knit that I had so much trouble with before I switched patterns.
  3. Play Civ VI
  4. Wind the Cascade Yarn worsted merino so I can gauge swatch for the Harvest sweater by Tin Can Knits. DEFINITELY start this December 1st.
  5. Decide on one idea for NaNoWriMo 2016. (Or nanoprep step 1)
  6. Finish Nanoprep blog post?
  7. Write up an Act 3 outline of said idea in step 5.
  8. Flesh out the outline as described in steps 5 and 6.
  9. Type up my “rules and reminders” for NaNoWriMo participation. Put on blog and or print out and hang up with NaNoWriMo word count calendar.
  10. Block the everyday shawl in green gradient.
  11. Visit the Ross Perot museum.
  12. Prepare to see Lindsey Stirling first weekend in November.
  13. Color some posters, in November too when I’m needing breaks from NaNoWriMo.
  14. Note any doctor appointments on NaNoWriMo word count calendar. (Post-Its if necessary)

Final Update: Preparing for Nanowrimo

Final list

WHY YOU SHOULD DO NANOWRIMO… AND WHY YOU SHOULDN’T (It amused me to go ahead and copy the blog post title from Chuck Wendig’s blog to be all in caps here.)

The actual prep page on the NaNoWriMo website

Outlining options according to Chuck Wendig – This is a very useful post.

Some very very serious prep, something for every day of the month of October – I’ve only used this as a guideline so far.

A guide to writing awesome characters by Chuck Wendig – need to read this still but I know it’ll be useful

How to guide – outlining in Scrivener – I need to remember this website exists.

Free e-book (pdf) – Nano for the New and the Insane: A NaNoWriMo Survival Guide – I’ve only started reading this

Courtesy of Janice Hardy’s Fiction University:

Planning Your Novel’s Beginning

Planning your Novel’s Middle

And her book Planning Your Novel: Ideas and Structure; A step-by-step guide to turning your idea into a novel – this book has helped me a TON

Scrivener keyboard shortcuts

Short list from “for the Dummies” that shows Mac and Windows

Better list for Mac

Preparing for NaNoWriMo

I’ll add to this as I come across more:

The actual prep page on the NaNoWriMo website

Outlining options according to Chuck Wendig – This is a very useful post.

Some very very serious prep, something for every day of the month of October – I’ve only used this as a guideline so far.

A guide to writing awesome characters by Chuck Wendig – need to read this still but I know it’ll be useful

How to guide – outlining in Scrivener – I need to remember this website exists.

Free e-book (pdf) – Nano for the New and the Insane: A NaNoWriMo Survival Guide – I’ve only started reading this

Courtesy of Janice Hardy’s Fiction University:

Planning Your Novel’s Beginning

Planning your Novel’s Middle

And her book Planning Your Novel: Ideas and Structure; A step-by-step guide to turning your idea into a novel – this book has helped me a TON

Scrivener keyboard shortcuts

Short list from “for the Dummies” that shows Mac and Windows

Better list for Mac